memories of the ’70s – Castle by David Macaulay

Image result for david macaulay the castleIn the late 1970s, a picture book was given the Caldecott Honor, and created a world within walls in Castle by David Macaulay.

The author’s premise was to reveal how a Welsh castle was built during the late 12th century.

The book starts with the construction process of Aberwyvern Castle and reveals medieval life on each page, as Kevin Le Strange becomes Lord of Aberwyvern.

Written and illustrated by Macaulay, a former architect, the detailed pen and ink drawings show how how the fortification was made, and how it starts with two concentric circles, built on the shore of the River Wyvern.

Macaulay was influenced by the numerous castles he saw when he was young and by real-life Welsh castle, Conwy Castle.

As much a history book as a book about engineering, construction and ancient skills,  Castle shows why certain spots are chosen for the drawbridge, the outer walls, moats, dungeon and the gatehouses as well as the apartments, kitchen and great hall.

Published in hardcover in 1977 by Houghton, the book revealed all the secrets of building a castle, as well as allowing readers to imagine what it was like to live in a stone building created in the late 1200s in northern Wales.

Awarded the Caldecott Honor in 1978,  Castle is still in print thanks to publisher HMH Books for Young Readers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Waheeda Harris

A pop culture junkie with a penchant for exploring our planet.
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