memories of the ’80s – album design

In this decade, the stlyle was distinctive – bold graphics, bright and neon colours, and plenty of swagger to make these albums covers stand out in the record store:

A whole lot of sex appeal in one simple photograph – Loverboy’s Get Lucky from 1981:

9 loverboy The Good, The Bad, The 80’s (Part One): Retro Pop Album Designs

The Boss also went for it with Born in the USA from 1984

1 stones The Good, The Bad, The 80’s (Part One): Retro Pop Album Designs

The Rolling Stones, now in their third decade, embraced the neon for the 1986 cover of Dirty Work .

Another great example of bold and neon – Men at Work’s Business as Usual from 1982:

4 menatwork The Good, The Bad, The 80’s (Part One): Retro Pop Album Designs

While The Cure’s Boys Don’t Cry also went for the neon style:

11 cure The Good, The Bad, The 80’s (Part One): Retro Pop Album Designs

And for bold – how about the memorable cover of Van Halen MCMLXXXIV aka 1984:

7 vanhalen The Good, The Bad, The 80’s (Part One): Retro Pop Album Designs

These images, many over 30 years old, are distinct, bold and definitely made the ol’ record store a place where many fans clamoured for the poster for their bedroom wall.

memories of the ’70s – album design

This decade’s distinctive style came from many creative minds; for several bands, their album design and image was created by a Japanese artist: Tadanori Yokoo.

Emerson Lake and Palmer

(Above – Emerson Lake and Palmer 1972)

His unique use of photo collage style to create a distinctive album cover became a distinctive quality – especially his use of photography, graphics, symbolism and layering to give the album covers depth as well as for those who were curious – a lot to consider.

Tangerine Dream

Miles Davis, Agharta

(Above – Tangerine Dream 1976 &  Miles Davis Agharta 1975)

Starting his career in the theatre, Yokoo was fascinated by mysticism and psychadelia that was prevalent in the 1960s. By the 1970s, the Japanese designer was an internationally recognized artist, with a major exhibition at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art in 1972.

Cat Stevens

Earth, Wind, & Fire

The two above from Cat Stevens and Earth, Wind and Fire (1972 & 1976)  mix the unique images of the band with well-known images of history, art and religion. And somehow in the 1970s, this as a design that didn’t provoke discussion or controversy.